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  • 08 Sep 2014 5:07 PM | Anonymous

    FabLab LLC is now the authorized MakerBot Reseller for the Puget Sound Region, bringing MakerBot 3D products including MakerBot Replicator 2X, MakerBot Replicator 2 Desktop 3D Printer, MakerBot Digitizer – Desktop 3D Scanner, the recently released MakerBot Replicator Mini -Compact 3D Printer, MakerBot Replicator (Fifth Generation Model), MakerBot Replicator Z18 Desktop 3D Printer to the northwest.


    Tacoma, WA, September 8th, 2014 -- FabLab, the high-tech workshop and 3D design studio, has added MakerBot 3D Printers, Supplies, Support and Training to its list of capabilities and is now an authorized reseller of MakerBot 3D printers, 3D scanners, supplies, and training.

     

    “We are very excited about the Fifth Generation products including the Replicator, the Mini, and the Replicator Z18. These new machines are built with the user in mind and are easier to set up and maintain than earlier models. The Z18 has a massive 12x12x18 inch build envelope.” comments Stephen Tibbitts, Managing Director.

     

    For the past couple of years, FabLab has provided specialized training classes for educators and has provided technical support where necessary to keep machines working properly. FabLab is now in a position to sell and support the machines in addition to training and servicing.

     

    Although FabLab works with inventors, engineers, architects, entrepreneurs and artists, a big focus is on education and making sure students in our local communities are exposed to additive manufacturing which is being touted as the “Next Industrial Revolution”. In order to reach the students, you first have to educate and support the educators.

     

    CTE (Career Technical Education) and STEAM (Science Technology Engineering Art Mathematics) instructors from school districts around the Puget Sound region have tapped FabLab for 3D printing, training and support. Now FabLab Tacoma offers sales of both the machines and consumables.

    About FabLab:

    Founded in May 2012, FabLab is a membership-based, do-it-yourself workshop and fabrication studio providing access to a vibrant community of highly creative people and a multitude of high quality machines, tools and software. FabLab offers meet-ups, classes, workshops and instruction for people of all ages and skill levels.

    For information visit http://www.FabLabTacoma.com, email info@FabLabTacoma.com. You can follow FabLab on Twitter at "@FabLabTacoma." FabLab is also on Facebook as "FablabTacoma".

     

  • 02 Mar 2014 6:33 PM | Anonymous
    This video was shot at OlyMEGA and then Tom Layson interviews Stephen Tibbitts of FabLab Tacoma in the studio.

     VIDEO: The Maker Economy on Northwest Now !







  • 14 Nov 2013 5:49 PM | Anonymous
    “Where are the robots?” “How do I get started on my new invention?” “Can I take that
    huge dinosaur home with me?” These were a few of the questions asked by local Cub
    Scouts from pack 219 of Tacoma’s North End, during their visit to Tacoma’s FabLab.

    In October, a group of ten Cub Scouts descended on Tacoma’s FabLab, a high-tech
    workshop. This mecca for the creative is located on Market Street just up the hill from
    the University of Washington Tacoma campus.

    Attracting inventors, hobby enthusiasts and artists, this innovative prototyping center
    provides a space where anyone can create with laser cutters, 3D printers, plasma
    cutters, welders and much more. Only one’s imagination limits the possibilities of what
    can be thought up and built.

    FabLab co-owner, William Davis, hosted the group of boys for two hours on a Thursday night in October.
    Entering the lab with eyes wide, the
    boys were quickly taken under the wingof William as he led the young men
    through his creative labyrinth much like
    Willie Wonka and the lucky five
    children at his fabulous chocolate factory.

    “It’s really a treat to host these young
    minds at the lab tonight,” said William. “I
    remember my times as a Scout working
    on projects with my father- he was always interested in introducing me to new
    technologies and combining them with good-old fashion know-how. We were never
    above getting our hands dirty. That’s really what this place and tonight is about.”

    The first stop saw the boys huddled around a laser cutter where William explained the
    technicality behind the machine but then quickly got the contraption humming. The
    scouts stood transfixed as a dazzling laser
    precisely ducked and dived around a thin
    piece of particleboard, making fine cuts.

    Next, William brought the boys to a
    leather-making station where each boy
    was encouraged to let their imagine run
    wild as they creatively stamped out dog
    tags. A souvenir each boy would take
    home.

    Through a swinging door and past a
    lightning rod snapping away, the boys
    were taken to a room filled with standard

    power tools that were anything but ordinary. Governed by computers and mechanics,
    these tools made the impossible possible. Soon, the scouts surrounded William around
    a plasma welder. Face shields dawned, William demonstrated plasma cutting through
    heating a gas to roughly 30,000 degrees Fahrenheit and slicing through metal like a hot
    knife through butter.

    Mouths agape, the boys removed their hoods and followed William to their final station.
    Using the latest technology William demonstrated how 3D modelling allows anyone to
    build what their imagination can fathom. Through a 3D printer, William showed how
    layering polymers allow something on a screen to be plucked moments later as an
    actual form from a tray.



    Tacoma’s FabLab marked their first anniversary this month and continues to thrive as
    the place in Pierce County for high-tech prototyping and hobbying. But, for Tacoma’s
    Cub Scouts of pack 219 is will be remembered as a place where imaginations can run
    wild.

    About Tacoma’s Fab Lab:

    FabLab is Tacoma’s premier membership-driven prototyping and technology workshop.
    FabLab Tacoma offers monthly classes in prototyping, welding, 3d printing, design and
    more. Membership is available for individuals, families and now through a pre-paid
    punch card.

    Group tours, corporate team-building exercises, classes and projects available upon
    request.

    Membership and class info can be found at:
    http://www.fablabtacoma.com

    1938 Market Street
    Tacoma, WA 98402

    Tuesday - Saturday 10AM - 10PM
    Sunday - 1PM - 8PM
    Monday – closed

    Contact:
    William Davis
    Marketing Director, Co-Founder
    FabLab Tacoma
    william @ fablabtacoma.com

    Lab Phone: 253-426-1267
    www.fablabtacoma.com
    info@fablabtacoma.com
  • 06 Nov 2013 5:07 PM | Deleted user

    Just in time for the Holidays!  Each Punch Card entitles its user to 5 visits to FabLab Tacoma.  An incredible value at $150, it expires 1 year after purchase.


    We all know a few people on our holiday shopping lists who are impossible to shop for.  Or... maybe you are that impossible DIY-Maker who just can't wait to get their hands on those new tools and toys.  Tell your friends you have found the perfect gift, or buy it for yourself!



  • 20 Aug 2013 10:47 PM | Deleted user
    Did you miss the recent news story featuring FabLab Tacoma? If so, you can see it here: Thanks to Pierce County Television for stopping by!
  • 19 Jun 2013 9:45 PM | Anonymous

    Cutting Metal with Plasma- New Machines and Opportunities as FabLab Tacoma Grows

    Tacoma, WA , June 19th, 2013 -- FabLab has added CNC (computer numeric controlled) plasma cutting to its list of tools and capabilities.


    FabLab Tacoma, Pierce County’s first membership-based high-tech workshop and fabrication studio, provides public access to computerized cutting or etching of wood, plastic, glass, fabric and other materials. With the new plasma cutter, steel, aluminum and a variety of other metals can now be cut as well. The Torchmate CNC plasma cutter brings robotic control to metal work.


    “We are happy to bring this capability in house for our members.” Said Stephen Tibbitts, Director of FabLab. “It should be useful for custom metal art, robot design, machinery, tooling, product development and more. We are looking forward to adding additional capabilities periodically as activity and membership grows at FabLab.”


    Over the past 9 months, members have embraced other computer-controlled pieces of machinery in the FabLab including the a CNC router and a laser cutter. Many have attended introductory classes for each machine to learn or sharpen their skills. For many members, the laser is their first introduction to computer controlled machinery, where they learn safety, 2D computer design, and the settings and techniques necessary for cutting a variety of materials. The laser can cut many materials  such as wood, leather, or acrylic but it cannot cut metal. This is where the need for the Plasma CNC comes in.


    “I see the plasma CNC as a natural progression of the equipment here at the lab.” said William Davis, class instructor and co-founder of FabLab Tacoma. “The laser, like most computer controlled machinery, works on a basic coordinate system moving along 3-dimensional axes to cut out a design in a material.” Once students have an understanding of this, they can understand the plasma cutter, the CNC router, or even 3D printing.




    What is Plasma?


    The plasma cutter is a technology that has been around since the mid 1960’s but recent advances have allowed plasma cutters to become more accurate and accessible through computer control.  Plasma, as you may remember from science class, is the fourth state of matter. Like a solid, liquid, or gas, matter can be changed from one state to another by changing the temperature.


    Plasma is formed when gas is superheated; in this case, plasma is formed by heating oxygen to an extremely high temperature using electricity. At high temperatures, the oxygen molecules begin to break apart and the atoms start to split. All the parts of the atoms move around very fast and break into ions and electrons. When all these parts of atoms move around, the collide and create lots of energy creating plasma.


    When the plasma cutter contacts metal, it creates a spark, and the reaction creates a stream of plasma moving at 20,000 feet per second and at a temperature of 30,000 degrees fahrenheit, enough to blast a slab of metal a ½ inch thick!


    The computer controls the intensity of the spark, moving the cutting head back and forth along the metal to cut out intricate designs. Since the machine is computer controlled, designs can be repeated and cut with precision not possible by hand.




    About FabLab Tacoma


    Fablab Tacoma is a membership-based, do-it-yourself workshop and fabrication studio providing access to a vibrant community of highly creative people and a multitude of high quality 3D Printing and milling machines, fabrication tools and software. FabLab offers meet-ups, classes, workshops and instruction for people of all ages and skill levels.


    For information visit http://www.FabLabTacoma.com, email info@FabLabTacoma.com. You can follow FabLab on Twitter at "@FabLabTacoma". FabLab is also on Facebook as "FabLabTacoma".
  • 02 Apr 2013 7:05 PM | Anonymous
    Alec Clayton describes FabLab as a resource for local artists in northwestmilitary.com
    FabLab-Tacoma-is-a-fabulous-resource-for-artists
  • 26 Mar 2013 6:00 PM | Anonymous
    High-Tech Workshop Made Available for Students and Faculty


    Tacoma, WA , March 26th, 2013 - FabLab, the first membership-based high-tech workshop and fabrication studio in Pierce County, has agreed to support the University of Washington – Tacoma’s Institute of Technology by providing facilities, equipment, and expertise in 3D printing, laser-cutting, computer controlled tools, and conventional shop tools.

    Starting in April, the UWT will offer classes at FabLab including “TCES 490, How to Build (Almost) Anything”, patterned after classes taught at MIT.

    “Everyone at UWT’s Institute of Technology undefined students, staff and faculty undefined is excited about FabLab getting off the ground. FabLab offers people great opportunities to design and build just about anything, and students studying Computer Engineering and Systems at UWT now have design tools at their disposal that the campus labs simply can’t offer.” Said Rob Friedman, Director of the Institute of Technology, UW Tacoma. “FabLab is a good example of the kind of partnerships that UWT wants to establish with local entrepreneurs, retailers and other businesses, each offering facilities and expertise for the greater good of the students and community.” Friedman continued.

    “We are pleased that the UWT has chosen to utilize FabLab Tacoma and are eager to see the creative minds of the students at work. I hope FabLab will help facilitate and inspire invention.” Said Stephen Tibbitts, Founder of FabLab. “Since opening its doors in November, FabLab is on its way to becoming a sustainable resource for the UWT and the community as a whole.”

    About FabLab: Founded in May 2012, FabLab is a membership-based, do-it-yourself workshop and fabrication studio providing access to a vibrant community of highly creative people and a multitude of high quality machines, tools and software. FabLab offers meet-ups, classes, workshops and instruction for people of all ages and skill levels. For information visit http://www.FabLabTacoma.com, email info@FabLabTacoma.com. You can follow FabLab on Twitter at “@FabLabTacoma.” FabLab is also on Facebook as “FablabTacoma”.
  • 01 Dec 2012 6:03 PM | Anonymous
    Local Artist brings Old-world Craftsmanship to High-tech Fabrication

    Tacoma, WA, December 1, 2012 - Local leatherworker and artist, Tamara Clammer, will offer a mask-making class utilizing the laser cutter/engraver at Fablab Tacoma in preparation for First Night.

    Tamara Clammer is a self-taught leatherworker who creates and sells high-quality masquerade masks. She often collaborates with local artists and the burgeoning “Do it Yourself” or “Maker” community. Tamara shared: “I facilitate collaboration when possible, and seek additional resources that may be useful or interesting.”

    Tamara learned about FabLab Tacoma, the new community workshop, in an article from the local paper. “When I came to Fablab Tacoma and saw the laser cutter, I instantly knew that it would be an amazing tool. I used to use an X-acto knife and beeswax to cut out prototypes of my masks. I realized that utilizing the laser cutter could save me time and frustration, and allow me to do some engraving on my pieces that I never could have done before.”

    Tamara worked with Steve Tibbitts, a FabLab Tacoma owner, on her first laser cut mask project. “First we created a template out of construction paper- kind of like making snowflakes back in elementary,” said Tamara. She then fit the paper mask to her face to mark where the eye holes would go.

    Next, Steve scanned the paper mask into a graphics editing program allowing her to create a digital image of the mask. “It’s really a neat process,” said Steve Tibbitts, “we can scan in drawings, digitize them, edit them, and then send them to the laser to engrave them on almost anything.”

    The file was quickly sent to the laser cutter to be cut. “We wanted to make a prototype out of cardboard first, just to make sure everything was lined up right, and the filigree was engraving to the right spot and depth.” said said Tamara.

    Tamara will be offering a leather mask making workshop at FabLab Tacoma in preparation for First Night, an annual New Years festival in many cities around the world including Tacoma. The class will be offered at FabLab Tacoma on December 15th from 1-5 PM. Tickets can be found by visiting FabLabTacoma.com.

    About Tamara Clammer
    Tamara is a Doer in the Maker industry at Brown Paper Tickets, and a self-taught leatherworker, specializing in high quality masquerade style masks. She is an avid artist who enjoys teaching workshops, and collaborating with other artists.
    http://www.faceoddmasks.com
    http://tamarabrownpaper.wordpress.com

    About FabLab Tacoma
    Fablab Tacoma is a membership-based, do-it-yourself workshop and fabrication studio providing access to a vibrant community of highly creative people and a multitude of high quality machines, tools and software. FabLab offers meet-ups, classes, workshops and instruction for people of all ages and skill levels.

    FABLAB TACOMA
    Contact person: William Davis
    Telephone number: 253.426.1267
    Email address: info@fablabtacoma.com
    ###

  • 09 Oct 2012 6:06 PM | Anonymous
    3D Printer Arrives at FabLab

    FabLab introduces professional grade 3D printing and prototyping to Tacoma with the delivery of the Mojo Desktop 3D Printer from Stratasys (NASDAQ:SSYS).


    “3D printing has long been out of reach for many hobbyists and inventors. The process is typically slow, costly, and often must be done in facilities halfway across the country,” said FabLab Tacoma Founder, Stephen Tibbitts. “If I had an idea - say a smartphone case I was developing - I would have to go through a very costly prototyping process just to get my idea out of my head and developed into a physical object. That’s a huge barrier to overcome. This Mojo printer at FabLab Tacoma breaks down those barriers.”

    About the size of a large office printer, the Mojo 3D printer uses what is know as Fused Deposition Modeling (FDM). The printer works similar to the inkjet printers used in any home or office. However, instead of ink, the printer deposits a layer of ABS Plastic (the hard, durable plastic which Lego pieces are made of) onto a platform. The layers are extruded at such a high heat that they fuse together to become a solid object. Parts can be made of many hundreds of layers as each layer is less than a hundredth of an inch thick. After each deposited layer the platform is lowered slightly, eventually revealing a fully completed physical model or part.

    FabLab Tacoma, which opens in November in downtown Tacoma, aims to be the Northwest’s premier membership-based workshop for makers, students, educators, engineers, and artists. The Mojo printer is a key piece of equipment for the FabLab, allowing ideas to go from a sketch, to 3D model, to reality very quickly.

    “I am am going to use this to make my own chess pieces.” said John Worsham, a University of Washington Arts, Media and Culture student, as he watched the Mojo print a test piece. “I can model movie characters, miniatures of my friends- the possibilities are really endless.  How great would it be to have a board game piece modeled after yourself?”

    The FabLab is a short walk from anywhere on the University of Washington Tacoma campus. “I walk by the FabLab on my way to class every day. When I saw the laser, the tools, and the other pieces arriving, I stopped in for a tour. Knowing that all these tools are available for my use, I’m inspired by all the creative possibilities.” continued Worsham.

    About FabLab Tacoma

    Opening on November 1st, Fablab Tacoma is a membership-based, do-it-yourself workshop and fabrication studio providing access to a vibrant community of highly creative people and a multitude of high quality machines, tools and software. FabLab offers meet-ups, classes, workshops and instruction for people of all ages and skill levels.

    For information visit http://www.FabLabTacoma.com, or email info@FabLabTacoma.com. FabLab Tacoma is on Twitter as “@FabLabTacoma” and on Facebook as “FabLabTacoma”.

    ###
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